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Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2004 4:37 pm
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 Post subject: Beginning Chess player needs resources
PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2004 4:49 pm 
Ok;

So actually I'm not a beginning chess player. I learned at a young age the basic movements and left it at that. Now 30 years later I have decided to relearn chess and have made a stark discovery. I suck!

I have recently purchased Chess for Idiots and Chess Mentor 2.0 to help me out. I am well on my way into both these resources. I also have Fritz 8.0 on order. On chessmaster 7000 I rate as a 750. On most internet games against humans I lose. I would really like to get good at this game because it fascinates me, but am afraid of a losing battle against frustration. I also know I may have to give myself some time here to develop my skills.

Anyways, I have searched the net and am currently wondering about resources that will assist someone who is at my elementary level and would like to learn more. I'm looking for:

Internet resources - including tutorials and esp discussion forums.
Books - applicable to my level
Software Tutorials - applicable to my level.

I realize that many of you on this forum maybe very skilled players. This is the reason why I come to this forum, to receive the advice of those who also have travelled this path. Do please remember in any advice you offer, that if it is too complex, it will go over my head. (eg Total chess training - looks like a wonderful package, but is rated 1600 - 2400 which is completely over my head)

Thanks in advance for any and all help


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Joined: Mon Aug 25, 2003 2:20 pm
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2004 10:40 pm 
Have a look at this:

http://www.chessbase.com/support/support.asp?pid=258


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Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 8:04 pm
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Location: Texas
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 07, 2004 1:01 am 
Hi,

Every journey...

Steve's article is awesome! Every beginner should read it. It speaks to us all.

Here is a link to ChessCentral's selection of beginner's books, software, and videos:

http://www.chesscentral.com/cat/beginner.htm

Hope that helps!


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Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2004 4:37 pm
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 Post subject: Thanks
PostPosted: Wed Jan 07, 2004 5:58 am 
Have read the article and it is very helpful. Thanks for the replies. I will be looking to spend some christmas money shortly.

Thanks again


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Pawn
 
Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2003 12:22 am
Posts: 18
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2004 2:31 am 
I also own ChessMaster 7000, and rate about the same as you do. I think it's a 723. Ok, this sounds super cheesy I know, but perhaps you and me could help each other out? Ya know, play against each other a lot, let each other know about great websites and perhaps a cool new trap we discovered (though I doubt that'll happen any time soon). Again, sorry for the cheesiness, but I think it sounds like a good idea.


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Rook
 
Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 7:49 pm
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Location: Texas
 Post subject: Re: Beginning Chess player needs resources
PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2004 8:37 pm 
Quote:
quote="Tangogulf"
Now 30 years later I have decided to relearn chess and have made a stark discovery. I suck!


Well, self-knowledge is the beginning of wisdom, grasshopper :lol:

One of the all-time great books for any beginner is Chernev's "Logical Chess Move by Move" - [url=http://www.chesscentral.com/beginner_chess_hays/logical_chess_move.htm]check it out
[/url]
I still remember clearly playing through this book "move by move" 35 years ago. You can't go wrong.


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Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2003 8:04 pm
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2004 9:42 pm 
35 years!

I always knew you were a fount of ancient wisdom.

Oh great sage of chess, please continue to pontificate to us grasshoppers that we may imbibe from the deep rivers of your knowledge.

8)


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King
 
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2004 10:11 pm
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2004 11:05 pm 
Just a suggestion. After reading through Logical Chess: Move by Move by Chernev, you may want to read through Understanding Chess: Move by Move by GM John Nunn. Chernev definitely makes his book a much easier read, but it is interesting to see the how the game of chess has progressed through the years. Logical Chess has many games from the 30's and 40's and Understanding Chess has many games from the 80's and 90's.


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King
 
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2003 3:12 pm
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 7:59 pm 
Hi!
Two suggestions for you Mr. tango,

The most valueable thing you can buy costs 2 dollars. It is a scorebook. Score the moves of your game manually for a while. (That means write down the chess-moves with a pencil on piece of paper in a special book). I believe that if you are disciplined to write down your moves before you play them that you will think about them longer. And having a written record entices you to review those errors which you believe you can correct. also, having good scoresheets is fundamental in recieving help from other chessplayers who will read them.
the second peice of advice is to purchase either "beginner's chess school cd" or "tactics for beginners cd" published by convekta/ chess assistant. Either of these items are priced for casual users-- under $30 US-- and you'll get bang for your buck. You don't need an expensive playing engine to improve your game, better to spend the cash on training. And "crafty" ( a powerful amateur chess engine) is free and included in these trainers.
Have Fun! Loose Digit


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Pawn
 
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 9:50 am
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2004 12:10 pm 
What I have to advise is:
Join a chess club!

It's fun and you'll learn a lot of chess really quick!

(But if you're only used to playing on a computer screen, the look and feel of a real chessboard might seem bedazzling!)


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Joined: Sun Mar 21, 2004 7:58 pm
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 21, 2004 8:47 pm 
Some advice regarding the beginner-stage:

1. Buy a book with Master-games. Play through the games and dont bother with the different lines suggested. If you work through them in a slow pace you will pick up things which are "Need-to-know".
I recommend "107 Great Chess Battles 1939-1945" by Alexander Alekhine.

2. Write down your moves, even if it is against a computer. This way you will get aquainted with the board, which is a must. And it is interesting to play old games and see how much, and how fast you have improved.

3. Get to know an opening (fairly) well. Ruy Lopez/Spanish is always good if you play white. The French (e4 e6) and the Indian Defences (d4 Kn f6) are good for black.

4. You can play endgames against a computer, or against a friend. Just put some pieces on the board and see what happens. Start with pawns, and add rooks later on, perhaps 1 rook and 4 pawns each. You will soon see what should be done, and what you should avoid.

5. Play Correspondence Chess on the net. That is, you have 3 days to contemplate your move before pressing "Send". Its Your Turn is a nice site with players of varying levels.

6. The words "No. I cant understand this" doesnt exist in chess.

I was also in my 30s when i took up chess. And I thought that I would never understand a thing about the game. But it will come to you, sooner than later, trust me.


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King
 
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2003 4:54 pm
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Location: Michigan, U.S.A.
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 08, 2004 7:57 pm 
Here is a link http://www.ex.ac.uk/~dregis/DR/chess.html
Check out the coaching page.
Mhoram :twisted:


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Pawn
 
Joined: Sat Jan 22, 2005 9:58 pm
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Location: Florida
 Post subject: Re: Beginning Chess player needs resources
PostPosted: Sat Jan 22, 2005 10:26 pm 
Tangogulf wrote:
Ok;



Internet resources - including tutorials and esp discussion forums.
Books - applicable to my level
Software Tutorials - applicable to my level...

Thanks in advance for any and all help




Hi...I also learned chess as a kid, was a decent player (in my Jr High School Tournaments, that is), and now that I'm in my 40s, I want to get better at the game as well... My CM9000 rating is about 1175 right now, after about 40 or 50 "rated" games, but I've come across a couple of books that have helped me...

1) "Win At Chess" by Ron Curry. The subtitle is "A Comprehensive Guide to Winning Chess for the Intermediate Player".
In this book, the author talks about his experiences playing the game, and what he had to learn at each level (1000, 1200, 1400 etc.) in order to improve his game. His current rating is over 2000. One thing to keep in mind is that the best teachers are not necessarily the best players, but are often just interested amateurs (Imagine being in a chess class and having Garry Kasparov as our teacher...do you think we'd understand a word he says? I know I wouldn't).
I purchased this book at a Barnes and Noble bookstore. The author has had an opening named after him (it's an interesting study).

The other book is called "Rapid Chess Improvement", by Michael de la Meza. The subtitle is "A Study Plan for Adult Players". It is published by "Everyman Chess".

This book is actually pretty amazing. The author, like us, wanted to improve his chess as an adult, and after numerous players and coaches told him he couldn't improve much as an adult player, he personally designed a study program which enabled him to improve his rating by 700 points within a two year period.

Basically, de la Meza points out that tactical ability, or lack thereof, is the deciding factor in almost every game played among "class" players (FYI - a "Class" player is player rated from 900-1899 (FIDE) or from 1000-1999 (USCF). There are different levels of class ("E" being the lowest and "A" being the highest). After Class A you become an Expert, and then a Master or National Master).

He designed a number of Chess Vision Drills which enable you to spot tactical shots and to calculate faster in your head. I was actually in the beginning stage of his training program when we got whacked by Hurricane Charley in August 2004, so a lot of things got put on hold.

Learning tactics is the key to becoming a better player at the beginning. De la Meza recommends learning opening PRINCIPLES, but not studying openings per se, pointing out that Kasparov himself has said that "openings don't really matter at the beginning level".

Because there is no opening which wins a piece by force, if you find yourself constantly down a piece by move 10 or move 15, it's because we fail to see a tactical shot, or we simply leave a piece en prise. His vision drills can be very helpful in spotting tactical possibilities for both you and your opponent.

I would recommend picking up this book and reading the first couple of chapters, if you see it in a bookstore. See what you think.

He also quotes several instructors who claim that most players who spend their time studying openings never really get very far. It doesn't do any good to know an opening if you drop pieces in the middlegame and reach the endgame a piece down.

De la Meza also points out that, once a player learns the basic move and a couple of simple mates, there really is no clear-cut way to continue ones study of the game. 99.9% of us just buy books that look interesting and pursue a random study of the game. But just as this method would not lead to mastery of any other academic topic, neither would it work in chess.


It will, of course, require hard work to become a good player as an adult (adults have too many other things on their minds, and tire more easily). But check out these books and see what you thiink.

One of the great things about chess books is that there are so many of them. But picking out the right book for one's individual needs can be difficult.

Good luck to you. Keep us posted on any good books or videos that you find.


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King
 
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2004 12:27 pm
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 24, 2005 1:37 pm 
I've got Chessmaster 9000, and I don't know how many of its features are new since 7000. If you've got the tactics training bits in CM7000, then I'd strongly suggest using them.

My ratings against Chessmaster characters climbed a good deal when I started forcing myself to spend 30min playing one game, rather than charging in and playing too fast. 30min is still a very fast game by chess standards, but most of us don't have 3 hour slots free in our days!

If you set CM characters very short times to move, they still play pretty well (this is true of all computers), so if you play your computer, make sure you don't let its rapid replies intimidate you into playing rapidly. If necessary, give it longer to think, too. It'll benefit you more than the computer....

Also, if you get flattened, don't keep playing until you win. The flattenings will just get worse as frustration creeps in... instead call it a loss and work out why, if you feel up to it. Sometimes it's fun to step back to where you think it went wrong, and explore a different avenue. You and your adversary have just explored a beautiful piece of chess, whether you were on the losing end or the winning...

Make tactics training fun. If you can, as well as promising yourself that single, 30min game, promise yourself 10 min of working through one of chessmaster's tactics exercises (or something similar, your favourite book).

It doesn't matter what resources you buy if you don't use them, and you won't use them if it's not fun, so don't buy anything that isn't fun...


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King
 
Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 2:20 pm
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 24, 2005 3:01 pm 
I agree with others who have emphasized tactics as a cornerstone in building your foundation of chess knowledge. Tactical training requires learning certain motifs--pins, forks, skewers, and so on--and learning certain patterns, such as how the several pieces work together to checkmate the opposing king.

I created my "Checklist of Checkmates" for beginning players. http://www.angelfire.com/poetry/wulebgr/checklist.htm


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