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 Post subject: Teaching Chess To A 10 Year Old
PostPosted: Fri May 29, 2009 8:37 pm 
My 10 year old nephew is wanting to learn how to play chess. I am a beginner myself so I'm not really sure how to teach him. How do I tell if he is mature enough for the game? Any guidance as far as books or websites would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.


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 Post subject: Re: Teaching Chess To A 10 Year Old
PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2009 4:52 pm 
newchessqueen wrote:
My 10 year old nephew is wanting to learn how to play chess. I am a beginner myself so I'm not really sure how to teach him. How do I tell if he is mature enough for the game? Any guidance as far as books or websites would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.



If he wants it himself, he is mature enough. Give him the opportunity to play the game, and give him also the opportunity to leave it for what it is if he loses his interest. it's a lot of fun to practice against human opponents, but a good second is specialized software. Check out http://www.chesscentral.com/Chess_for_Kids_s/48.htm ; it might give you some ideas.
I'm not very familiar with online chess learning, but Googling turned up a lot of sites, like this one http://www.chesskids.com/

Good luck!


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 Post subject: Re: Teaching Chess To A 10 Year Old
PostPosted: Sun Jul 26, 2009 7:14 am 
Kids mostly learn by doing, not studying.

Start off simple by describing each piece and how they move. Start a "mock" game and allow them to make random valid moves. Once they get the hang of moves and turns, show them how to take. Don't mention strategy for the first few games. Play as if the winner is the one that takes the most pieces.

Later on, introduce check and checkmate. This is a difficult concept for kids to grasp, so don't bring it up while they are still learning piece names and how they move.

Finally, after a couple of "mock" games, introduce them to some really basic strategy such as always trying to attack and thinking one move ahead.

I have a simple site called http://beginnerchess.org. There is a downloadable cheat sheet showing what each piece looks like, how to set up the board, and how each piece moves. It may be a handy simple reference.

Hope this helps.


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 Post subject: Re: Teaching Chess To A 10 Year Old
PostPosted: Sat Mar 20, 2010 4:35 pm 
Your Child needs to see some basic mating positions, forks, pins and mini games.
I am international rated player from India. I am conducting online chess classes and also working as a playing partner. If you are interested pls mail me at playingpartner77@gmail.com.


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 Post subject: Re: Teaching Chess To A 10 Year Old
PostPosted: Mon Mar 22, 2010 12:18 pm 
Go to your local library and check out chess books for children. There should be plenty to pick from there. There will also be books for you. Good luck!


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 Post subject: Re: Teaching Chess To A 10 Year Old
PostPosted: Sat Jan 22, 2011 2:16 pm 
The way we all learned chess ("How pieces make movements") is fundamentally wrong. What we need to teach is: FIRST CONTACTS/INTERACTION BETWEEN PIECES, movements are secondary attribute of pieces controlling the board in the same fashion as they move (only the foot soldier can walk two ways).

If you think about it, the basis of chess is the followig:

1) Every pieces possesses power, they CONTROL/ATTACK some terrirtory on the board, there are invisible lines of force, or fire, or there is a field, or scope, or range of action, call it what you want,

2) Pieces CLOSE four lines going through the square the piece is posted on, due to its physical, "body presence", so that CONTROL (#1) stops there,

3) If an enemy piece finds itself in the LINE OF FIRE of an enemy pieces, it is UNDER ATTACK and can be CAPTURED.

That's foundation of chess, everything else: tactics, strategy, methods of play, all advanced concepts whatever it may be is just continuation of ##1-3. Even few elementary contacts between pieces (attack, protection, restriction, pin configuration) can all be reduced to #3 above.

So we need to teach kids to LOOK. Only then comes thinking and advanced concepts. The beginning of chess is ##1-3, pure GEOMETRY, two pieces being posted on the same line, two points defining a line - it is a VISION thing. It is sensory input to the "old" brain (of some 450 million years) that is the main switch in determining what visual information will go the "new" brain (neocortex), how the new information will be framed and stored, and how it will be used for decision making later.

The board vision ability is to become second nature, part of the instinct, stored safely somewhere in the "old" reptilian brain. That first period of our chess education where we are not aware of contacts between pieces, may take anywhere from two months (according to Gregory Levenfish), even years, quite often never ending. So we need to reinforce geometry and contacts the first thing. Instead of pushing wood around cluelessly, with developed chess vision your game becomes purposefull, driven by actaul requirements of the position.

Without developed board vision, there is no chess. The same way as there is no American footbal, or baseball, or soccer, or any "space control" sport or game, if we do not see what is going on as pieces ineract.

Imagine an NFL game where one team is about to touch down, while the defending team is "blind" and clueless NOT SEEING what is going on, all running in the opposite direction on the field...

NeuroChess


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 Post subject: Re: Teaching Chess To A 10 Year Old
PostPosted: Sun Feb 13, 2011 6:51 pm 
I teach chess for a living and have students that are much younger than ten. The key is his desire to learn. You have to make the learning aspect of this process interesting. I would suggest a program like Chessmaster because it has a complete tutorial section designed for children. The program is complete enough to provide instruction for his first year or two of lessons. I teach chess in public and private schools and we have found that kids love playing chess if it is presented in an interesting way. You can create interesting stories regarding the pieces that attracts the attention of a young mind. Chess also helps improve math and reasoning skills, which makes for better students later in their academic career. Do an online search for "free chess tutorials for kids" and you'll end up with a plethora of great teaching tools. Its a great game that bonds families together on the chess board.


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