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Knight
 
Joined: Thu Apr 07, 2005 11:28 pm
Posts: 38
Location: Garden Grove, CA
 Post subject: Looking for a tricky opening for white...
PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2006 11:44 am 
I have not been studying chess for too long (rated about 1400 now). I play many matches (first person to 3 games wins, must win by 2) with a friend of mine and we are about 50/50 right now overall. I need something to throw him off :twisted:. I am looking for an opening for white that will confuse him and hopefully trap him somehow. I usually play some form of the 2 knights opening or the fried liver attack, occasionally playing the queens gambit (not even sure if im playing it exactly right). If anyone could give me an idea of a sharp opening for white to study I would appreciate it. The friend I play with has about the same knowledge of openings that I have, so he should be easy to trick. Also, I understand that since I'm still rated low that my time might be better spent studying tactics, but I just finished reading "Winning Chess Tactics", and "Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess", so I wanted to learn a new opening to get an edge on my opponent. Thanks for any input!


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Pawn
 
Joined: Wed May 04, 2005 12:22 am
Posts: 21
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2006 9:44 am 
The English! 1.c4

My English Repertoire.

"The Setup" 1.c4 2.nc3 3.nf3 4.g3 5.bg2 6.0-0

INDIAN VARIATIONS
1.c4 nf6 2.nc3 e6 3. e4!
1.c4 nf6 2.nc3 g6 3.e4 d6 4.d4 bg7 5.f3
1.c4 nf6 2.nc3 d5 3.cxd5 nxd5 4.g3 nb6 5.bg2 g6 6.0-0 bg7 7.d4

REVERSED SICILIAN LINES
1.c4 e5 2.nc3 nc6/nf6 3.nf3 nf6/nc6 4.g3
1.c4 e5 2.nc3 d6 d4
1.c4 e5 2.nc3 c6 d4
1.c4 e5 2.nc3 nf6 3.nf3 nc6 4.g3 d5 5.cxd5 nxd5 6.bg2 nb6 7.0-0

SYMMETRICAL GAMES
1.c4 c5 2.nc3 nc6 3.g3 g6 4.bg2 bg7 5.a3
1.c4 c5 2.nc3 nf6 3.g3 d5 4.cxd5 nxd5 5.e3

OTHER
1.c4 e6 2.nf3 d5 3.g3 (RETI OPENING)

My english "rules of thumb"
1) Against the move Bb4, look at the response Nd5
2) Many lines in the english lead to positional queenside games.
3) Keep in mind the reacurring theme of the moves: a3, rb1 and b4. In doing this be careful if they play a5 to play b3 and then build, because of the move a4. The a5 move tends to leave a big hole on b5.
4) When black develops his bishop on c5, take a hard look at a central break with e3 and d4, ideally winning tempo on the bishop.
5) Be careful not to blunder your knight on c3 to a bishop on g7 with any "ne4" tricks by black.
6) Keep in mind, when a bishop is on g7 it is aiming at a1 - the startingplace of your rook.

I hope this helps, a keen study of this system, along with the Caro-Kann and general chess principals brought my USCF rating from 800 to 1500, where it now lies, in under six months.

Sterling Kolde


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Knight
 
Joined: Thu Apr 07, 2005 11:28 pm
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Location: Garden Grove, CA
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2006 4:46 pm 
Thanks for the informative reply Waffles! I am very excited to learn this new opening. After quickly playing through the variations you listed I am wondering what the best way to learn an opening is? I played a quick game on FICS using 1.c4 and got myself into a bad position quickly by not knowing what to do. Should I just print out those variations and play them over and over on a real board, or is there a better way. If there isn't I am prepared to work hard, I just want to go about it in the most efficient manner. Thanks again!


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Pawn
 
Joined: Wed May 04, 2005 12:22 am
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2006 1:35 am 
Over the last few months I have collected these books on the english:
1) Starting Out: The English
2) English...e5
3) Symmetrical English
4) English: Classical and Indian
5) English: Symmetrical Variations
6) The Dynamic English

I used these books and mixed and matched lines to form my favorite repertoire, as I presented. They are in no particular order. The Dynamic English is great if you plan to play 1.c4 2.g3, a popular move order at all levels of the game. I just order books off amazon, one at a time. It's fairly pointless to print off my sheet and play over the moves, as the english is definately not about the moves, but about the plan and the squares. You place your pieces against d5, and often play for queenside expansion. As long as you know the plans, moves won't fail you! Buy one book at a time, starting with either Starting Out: The English, or The Dynamic English. Those both have chapters on the symmetrical english, so only buy additional books if you are having trouble gaining an advantage or good position in those variations.

Hope I helped,
Sterling


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Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2003 12:42 am
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Location: Utrecht, The Netherlands
 Post subject: Re: Looking for a tricky opening for white...
PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2006 4:33 am 
o0obruceleeo0o wrote:
I have not been studying chess for too long (rated about 1400 now). I play many matches (first person to 3 games wins, must win by 2) with a friend of mine and we are about 50/50 right now overall. I need something to throw him off :twisted:. I am looking for an opening for white that will confuse him and hopefully trap him somehow. I usually play some form of the 2 knights opening or the fried liver attack, occasionally playing the queens gambit (not even sure if im playing it exactly right). If anyone could give me an idea of a sharp opening for white to study I would appreciate it. The friend I play with has about the same knowledge of openings that I have, so he should be easy to trick. Also, I understand that since I'm still rated low that my time might be better spent studying tactics, but I just finished reading "Winning Chess Tactics", and "Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess", so I wanted to learn a new opening to get an edge on my opponent. Thanks for any input!



To get the edge over your opponent, tricking is not the way. It depends too much on what he doesn't see, and after one time you playing the trick he knows and your strategy is worthless.

Don't bother too much with opening repertoire. Have a small repertoire of openings that you know reasonably well and of which you know to what kind of middle game it brings you. There the fun begins: you finding combinations he doesn't find, because of your tactical insight you developed better. So grab a book or program full of tactical exercises and start developing your tactical skills.

It's not only more productive than studying a trick opening, but gives you a _real_ edge. It doesn't give you an edge you're sure to lose in one game, but makes you stronger than your opponent. A trick opening or playing openings you don't understand what the purpose of is is like a lottery - sometimes you win, sometimes you lose. Understanding chess removes the lottery element and includes the basis you're looking for: getting stronger than your opponent, leading to a win.


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Knight
 
Joined: Thu Apr 07, 2005 11:28 pm
Posts: 38
Location: Garden Grove, CA
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2006 5:09 pm 
I wasn't really planning on being a better player by learning a trick, I was just looking for a cheap win I guess. I did end up winning the game I wanted to trick him on though, without using any tricks (rook+2 pawn vs rook+2 pawn endgame). Like I mentioned before I just finished reading Winning Chess Tactics and Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess. Would you reccomend any tactics books to follow up on these? I was looking at "Combination Challenge", but I'm a poor college student and I want to make sure the book I get next will be most beneficial. Thanks for the advice :). I guess I will hold off on my studies of the English opening until I get more tactics training under my belt...


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Pawn
 
Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2007 3:32 am
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2007 11:45 pm 
When I play against stronger players in my country I do 1.f4 this is a very good opening in my opinion against the 3 minute Blitz freaks in my country who can't seat still.


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Pawn
 
Joined: Sun Oct 28, 2007 3:32 am
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2007 11:47 pm 
You can watch some videos in youtube of GM Henrik Danielsen where he explains his 1.f4 system "the polar bear'' which is the Bird's Opening with a future g4 to take away black's Nf6 square.


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Knight
 
Joined: Wed Oct 03, 2007 6:35 pm
Posts: 27
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2007 6:58 pm 
Hey, you are always going to get more out of studying what interests you!

There are a lot of tricky openings out there, but you might look into

The Blackmar-Diemer: http://www.chesscentral.com/Blackmar-Di ... 15-bun.htm

and/or

two new gambit repertoire books:
http://www.chesscentral.com/Gambiteer-I ... teer-i.htm
http://www.chesscentral.com/Gambiteer-I ... eer-ii.htm

and/or

The King's Gambit
http://www.chesscentral.com/Complete-Ki ... 766983.htm


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Newbie
 
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2007 7:52 am
Posts: 2
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 8:35 am 
The Grob works pretty well.

1.g4

Usually it goes something like 1...d5 2.Bg2 Bxg4 3.c4 c6 and white plans to develop quickly and either get the pawn back or just get a huge development lead.


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King
 
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2006 10:09 pm
Posts: 148
Location: Placentia, CA
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2007 10:49 pm 
Shawn wrote:
Hey, you are always going to get more out of studying what interests you!

There are a lot of tricky openings out there, but you might look into two new gambit repertoire books:
http://www.chesscentral.com/Gambiteer-I ... teer-i.htm
http://www.chesscentral.com/Gambiteer-I ... eer-ii.htm

Gambiteer I is excellent, and provides a complete repertoire for White.

Gambiteer II provides only a partial repertoire: The Schliemann Defense against the Ruy Lopez (1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 f5), and the Albin Counter-Gambit (1 d4 d5 2 c4 e5).

There is a curious oversight in Gambiteer I. Author Nigel Davies recommends the Wing Gambit against the Sicilian Defense (1 e4 c5 2 b4 cb 3 a3), but amazingly doesn't quote any games or give any analysis indicating what to do if Black plays 3...ba! Otherwise, it's an excellent book. I'm not as enthusiastic about Gambiteer II, since it is insufficient to give the player a complete repertoire for Black.


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